Launch of the Tripartite Free Trade Area

SADC-EAC-COMESA Tripartite Free Trade Area Legal Texts and Policy Documents

Twenty four Member/Partner States have signed the Declaration; only Libya and Eritrea have not signed. The TFTA Agreement has been signed by the following 16 member countries: Angola, Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Djibouti, Egypt, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Swaziland, and Zimbabwe.

Related Links:

Documents from the Summit and the text of the final TFTA Agreement are available in the four official languages – English, Arabic, French and Portuguese
The Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA)
African Free Trade Zone (AFTZ)
Southern African Development Community (SADC)
Understanding the importance of the Tripartite Free Trade Area

Connect to a world of opportunity in Africa

The 2015 Trade Winds program offers U.S. companies the opportunity to explore eight markets in Sub-Saharan Africa. Hosted in South Africa, Trade Winds will feature an Africa-focused business forum, consisting of regional and industry specific conference sessions as well as pre-arranged consultations with U.S. Senior Government Diplomats representing commercial markets from 19 African countries. Additional trade mission stops will give participants the opportunity to conduct customized business-to-business meetings with pre-screened firms in Angola, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Africa, and Tanzania.

Between 2001 and 2008, Africa was one of the fastest growing regions of the world, with an average annual growth rate of 5.6 percent. Stable macroeconomic conditions, coupled with structural reforms, enabled this growth.  Africa is also the world’s second-largest and second-most populous continent making it rife with opportunities for U.S exporters. More than 20 African states form the Tripartite Free Trade Agreement making trade within Africa much easier and more efficient.

Between 2011-2015, 7 of the 10 fastest growing economies are expected to be in Sub-Saharan Africa. The graph below highlights areas of opportunity within Africa, based on several key energy industry sectors. Learn about opportunities for your industry in Africa with our one-page market overviews!

Participating in the Trade Winds Trade Mission will allow innovative U.S. companies to fully maximize their advantages in this promising and dynamic region!

Ex-Im Bank – Financing to Export American Power Generation Equipment

Media Contact: Lawton King (202-565-3200)

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, June 18, 2014

 Ex-Im Bank Approves Financing to Export American Power-Generation Equipment

 Deal Supports U.S Manufacturing Competitiveness and Supports 100 American Jobs

Washington, D.C. – The Board of the Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank) has voted to guarantee a $15 million loan extended by Rabobank International of Utrecht, Netherlands, to Energyst B.V. to facilitate the export of Caterpillar power-generation equipment.  According to Bank estimates derived from Departments of Commerce and Labor data and methodology, the credit will support approximately 100 U.S. jobs. Continue Reading →

Are You Ready To Export

Ken Mouradian is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Orlando Export Assistance Center. – Full Story

May 14, 2014

“I work with a lot of small businesses looking to begin exporting. It’s not uncommon for me to be asked, “How do you know if a company is export ready?”  The more relevant question is, “How does a company know that it’s export ready?” That’s a tricky one! For me, there are four main questions a company has to answer before it knows it’s export-ready:” ……Read More

Full Story

 

The New Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) Export Requirements

The New Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) Export Requirements | Global Reach Blog

The new requirements will be effective on April 5, 2014. The publication of the final rule amends the regulations published in 2008 that govern how exporters must file electronic export information with the Census Bureau.  An “informed compliance” period regarding the new regulations will be in place until October 2, 2013. ***This was updated as of April 8, 2014***

 

Rebuilding, Opportunity, Challenges in Philippines

Doug Barry is a Senior International Trade Specialist in the International Trade Administration’s Global Knowledge Center.

Developing countries have plenty of difficult tasks to overcome while modernizing. The Philippines was a special case, as a 2013 typhoon brought destruction and tragedy to the islands.  But some good news has returned to a population inching towards the 100 million mark.  For one thing, GDP growth is at 7.2 percent, among the highest growth rates in Asia. Continue Reading →

ITN

An ITN is essentially the passport for your export shipment.

The ITN (Internal Transaction Number) is the number you receive confirming your Electronic Export Information (EEI) has been accepted in the Automated Export System (AES). AESDirect filers will receive an email with the ITN after acceptance. The ITN begins with an X and consists of the year, month, day of acceptance and a 6-digit random number. For example, an ITN for an accepted filing on January 1, 2012, would look like X20120101999999.

In order to clear Customs at the port of export and send the shipment along its journey, the ITN must appear on the following (where applicable):

  • Bill of lading
  • Air waybill
  • Export shipping instructions
  • Other commercial loading documents

Unlike our international travel, there are some exceptions to the ITN requirement, including:

  • Export transactions valued at or under $2,500 that don’t require a license or
  • Non-licensed export transactions destined to Canada

However, barring those exceptions, a carrier (plane, vessel, train, truck) will not accept your export shipment without its corresponding ITN.

Essentially, without an ITN, in most cases you cannot export your merchandise.

For more information about the ITN, please call 1-800-549-0595,  Option #1. You may also find ITN and other trade terms in our Definitions page.